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Volcanic Ash Hazard – Considerations for aviation

 
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PaulJD



Joined: 15 Feb 2014
Posts: 1
Country: Australia

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 12:31 am    Post subject: Volcanic Ash Hazard – Considerations for aviation Reply with quote

Volcanic Ash Hazard – Considerations for aviation

OK guys, now to the topic of Volcanic Ash Hazards to aircraft. How much do you rememeber about the effects of volcanic ash / cloud penetration to aircraft? Test your memory with these questions here developed for AESO’s Aviation students this week.

The answers to these questions can be accessed from our media page on this link: http://aviationenglishskills.com/aeso-media-page/

Good luck!

• What is the melting point of volcanic ash?

• Why do significant deposits of volcanic glass coat the high pressure turbine blades?


• Why is volcanic ash / dust so abrasive?

• What can happen to inlet vanes on bypass engines that pass though volcanic ash cloud?


• What other aircraft components / systems may be affected by penetration into volcanic cloud?

• Why can’t volcanic ash cloud be picked up by airborne weather radar?


• What is significant, (in the context of volcanic ash hazard) about engine temperatures around ‘flight idle’ setting.?

• Globally, where are more than 75% of active volcanoes found?

• How many active volcanoes are there in the world?
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K.Haroon
Site Admin


Joined: 11 Dec 2005
Posts: 1306

PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 4:43 am    Post subject: Volcanic Ash Avoidance and Recovery Reply with quote

Arrow Volcanic Ash Avoidance and Recovery

A commercial airplane encounter with volcanic ash can threaten safety of flight because of resulting conditions that range from windshield pitting to loss of thrust in all engines. Developments in technology and communication networks have significantly decreased the probability of such an encounter in the last several years. Despite these developments however, a 737-700 recently flew through a volcanic ash cloud. Updated information about advancements made in ensuring safe operations and minimizing damage to the airplane during a volcanic ash encounter is now available to flight crews.
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